Here comes 2019: Changes to Remember

Rocio Paradela, Graduate Associate

With the start of the new year upon us and everyone slowly getting back to work, it’s time to reflect on what changes organisations need to keep in mind in 2019.

Fair Work Amendment (Casual Loading Offset) Regulations 2018

The new Fair Work Amendment (Casual Loading Offset) Regulations 2018 (Cth)1 came into force on 18 December 2018. These amendments are the direct result of the Full Court of the Federal Court of Australia decision in Workpac Pty Ltd v Skene2 (discussed in our previous blog) and seeks to address employers’ concerns that wrongly classified employees may be able to “double dip”.

Under the amendments, employers who have wrongly classified an employee as casual, may be able to offset the amount already paid as a casual loading to satisfy entitlements found to be owing to the employee under the National Employment Standard (“NES”).

The Regulation will only apply if all of the following conditions are met:

  • a person is employed on the basis that they are a casual employee;
  • the employer pays the employee an amount (the casual loading) that is clearly identifiable as an amount paid to compensate the employee for not having one or more relevant NES entitlements;
  • during all or some of the employment period, the person was in fact an employee other than a casual employee; and
  • the person makes a claim to be paid an amount in lieu of one or more of the relevant NES entitlements.

The new regulation applies to time worked both before and after 18 December 2018.

Modern Slavery Act

Following our blog on 15 October 2018, the Modern Slavery Act 2018 (Cth) has been passed by the Commonwealth Parliament and commenced on 1 January 2019, imposing new reporting requirements on employers.

Changes in Modern Awards

As part of the Fair Work Commission (“FWC”) four yearly review of modern awards, there have been several changes to some modern awards.

Termination Payments

A new termination payment clause has been included in some modern awards. This clause imposes a requirement that on termination an employer must pay an employee’s outstanding wages and other entitlements no later than seven days after the day the employment was terminated. Common modern awards that now have this clause include:

  • Clerks – Private Sector Award 2010;
  • General Retail Industry Award 2010; and
  • Banking, Finance and Insurance Award 2010.

Casual Conversion

On 1 October 2018, a model casual conversion clause was inserted in 84 modern awards (with others containing a modified clause or already having such a clause). This clause allows certain casual employees to request their employment be converted to permanent, provided they satisfy certain conditions. The employer can refuse to convert a casual employee to permanent status where the employer has consulted with the employee first, there are reasonable grounds to do so, and the refusal is put in writing within 21 days of the request being made.

Flexible Work

A new clause that supplements the flexible working arrangement provisions of the Fair Work Act 2009 (Cth) (the “FW Act“) has also been introduced into modern awards. In our blog of 2 October 2018 we explain the implications of this new clause.

It is worth noting that the FWC will no longer be required to conduct four-yearly reviews of modern awards as the Fair Work Amendment (Repeal of 4 Yearly Reviews and Other Measures) Act 20185 passed both houses of Parliament on 5 December 2018 and received Royal Assent on 11 December 2018.

Family and Domestic Violence Leave into NES

The Fair Work Amendment (Family and Domestic Violence Leave) Act 20186 took effect on 12 December 2018. The FW Act now includes the right for workers to take up to five days of unpaid family and domestic violence leave per year as part of the NES. This extends the right to all workers, beyond the coverage of the award system.

If you require any advice as to how these legislative changes may affect you or your organisation, please feel free contact People + Culture Strategies on (02) 8094 3100.


1 Fair Work Amendment (Casual Loading Offset) Regulations 2018 (Cth)
2 http://www.judgments.fedcourt.gov.au/judgments/Judgments/fca/full/2018/2018fcafc0131
3 4 yearly review of Modern Awards
4 Fair Work Amendment (Repeal of 4 Yearly Reviews and Other Measures) Bill 2017
5 Fair Work Amendment (Family and Domestic Violence Leave) Act 2018

The Devil is in the Detail: New Model Term on Flexible Working Arrangements

Therese MacDermott, Consultant and Rohan Burn, Graduate Associate

As part of the four-yearly review of modern awards, the Full Bench of the Fair Work Commission (“FWC”) has recently published a provisional model term that supplements the flexible working arrangement provisions of the Fair Work Act 2009 (Cth) (“FW Act”) (the “Model Term”).

This follows the FWC’s decision in March 2018 where it rejected a major overhaul of the right to request flexible working arrangements on the basis that what was being sought would effectively remove the ability of businesses to determine how to roster labour.

While acknowledging there was a significant unmet employee need for flexible working arrangements, the FWC settled on an approach that would see a model term incorporated into modern awards that would “facilitate” arrangements and raise awareness of the right, rather than offering an avenue to challenge a denial of a request. Hence, the end result is a proposed model term that sets out the process an employer must follow if it is responding to a request and gives the FWC a degree of supervision over this process, but no decision-making role in relation to the underlying decision to refuse the request.

Further submissions relating to any award-specific issues will be made within the next two weeks. Subject to these submissions, it is the FWC’s provisional view that all modern awards should be varied to insert the Model Term. That provisional view will only be displaced in respect of any particular modern award if it is demonstrated that there are matters or circumstances particular to that modern award that do not necessitate the inclusion of the Model Term.

Flexibility requests under the FW Act

Under section 65 of the FW Act:

  • an eligible employee may make a written request for a change in working arrangements which sets out the details of the change sought and the reasons for the change;
  • the employer must give the employee a written response to the request within 21 days, stating whether the employer grants or refuses the request;
  • the employer may refuse the request only on reasonable business grounds; and
  • if the employer refuses the request, the written response must include details of the reasons for the refusal.

Under this scheme an employer’s decision to refuse a request for a flexible working arrangement is not subject to any review or appeal. As a result, the FWC is unable to deal with a dispute about whether an employer had “reasonable business grounds” for refusing the request unless the parties have agreed in a contract of employment, enterprise agreement or other written agreement that the FWC can deal with the matter.

What will change with the Model Term

The proposed Model Term will apply to all categories of employees who make a request under section 65 of the FW Act, and is not confined to parents and carers only.

Of particular importance for employers are the following process aspects:

  1. before responding to the request, the employer must discuss the request with the employee and “genuinely try to reach agreement” on a change in working arrangements that will reasonably accommodate the employee’s circumstances having regard to:
    1. the needs of the employee arising from their circumstances;
    2. the consequences for the employee if changes in working arrangements are not made; and
    3. any reasonable business grounds for refusing the request;
  2. the written response to the request must include details of the reasons for the refusal, including the business ground(s) for the refusal and how the business ground(s) apply;
  3. if the employer and employee cannot agree (at (1) above) on a change in working arrangements, the written response must:
    1. state whether or not there are any changes in working arrangements that the employer can offer the employee so as to better accommodate the employee’s circumstances; and
    2. if the employer can offer the employee such changes in working arrangements, set out those changes in working arrangements;
  4. if the employer and the employee reached an agreement (at (1) above) on a change in working arrangements that differs from that initially requested by the employee, the employer must provide the employee with a written response to their request setting out the agreed change(s) in working arrangements; and
  5. disputes about whether the employer has discussed the request with the employee and responded to the request (as required) are to be dealt with under the consultation and dispute resolution clauses of the modern award.

As a consequence, a dispute resolution clause can only be relied on in respect of a dispute about whether the employer has discussed the request with the employee and responded to the request, rather than the substantive decision whether to grant the request.

Implications

While the Model Term (for the most part) may already reflect the practices that organisations engage in, it does:

  • require employers to be mindful of the level of genuine deliberation and consultation they engage in with employees in responding to requests; and
  • increase the regulatory burden in administering requests.

It is also likely that organisations may find that, in the bargaining context, employees (or their bargaining representatives) seek to build on the Model Term and expand its scope to include disputes about whether an employer had “reasonable business grounds” to refuse the request within the dispute resolution clause.

PCS recommends that organisations update staff who are responsible for dealing with these requests (particularly line managers) about these proposed changes and any practices that may need to be revisited as a result of these changes.

Organisations should also consider the impact of these changes on employees who are not award covered and consider whether it will treat all employee requests in accordance with the proposed Model Term, or whether it will adopt different approaches for requests by award and non-award employees.

When is employment correctly characterised as casual?

Meriska Lourens, Associate

The approach to characterising casual employment was the subject of a recent determination of the Federal Court of Australia. This decision necessitates that organisations review their engagement practices around casual employment.

The Facts

The employee was a fly-in-fly-out truck driver and argued that he was a permanent full-time employee because his employment was continuous, predictable and determined in advance. On this basis he claimed to be entitled to payment for accrued annual leave when his employment was terminated.

The employer contended that:

  • it engaged the employee as a casual under its Agreement (making him ineligible for annual leave and other entitlements);
  • the employee was engaged by the hour and could choose when and where to work;
  • the Agreement described the employee as a casual; and
  • both it and the employee regarded his employment to be of a casual nature.

The Decision

The Court was asked to consider whether Parliament intended the words “casual employee” in the legislative provision granting the entitlement to annual leave to be used in their ordinary sense, their legal sense or a specialised non-legal sense.

Ultimately the Court found in favour of the employee and settled on a characterisation of “casualness” as involving an “absence of a firm advance commitment as to the duration of the employee’s employment or the days (or hours) the employee will work“.

The rationale for this is that employees who don’t have this firm advanced commitment will have the capacity to enjoy breaks from work when they choose, and therefore do not need to be guaranteed annual leave.

What a “no firm advance commitment” looks like

The Court outlined a range of indicia relevant to a characterisation of casualness, including:

  • irregular work patterns;
  • uncertainty;
  • unpredictability;
  • intermittency of work; and
  • unpredictability

Taking Stock

The decision has led employer groups to call for changes to prevent casual workers “double dipping” by claiming annual leave on top of a casual loading, and for a clear definition of “casual employees” in the legislation.

Unions have responded to the decision stating that there could be a sizable proportion of employees who have been incorrectly characterised as being engaged casually, and that those that have been in regular and predictable work patterns may be entitled to paid annual leave.

PCS recommends reviewing how your organisation engages with its casual workforce. It is risky for organisations to rely simply on the fact that an employee has been engaged on an hourly basis or that the applicable award or agreement provides for a definition of casual employment where this does not match the actual form and manner in which casuals are in fact engaged.

Updates to Victorian long service leave and labour hire legislation

Daniel McNamara, Graduate Associate and Rocio Paradela, Graduate Associate

Businesses that operate in Victoria need to be mindful of recent legislative changes in this jurisdiction. Two areas subject to change in Victoria are changes to long service leave entitlements and the new labour hire licensing framework.

Long Service Leave

The Victorian Parliament has passed new long service leave legislation, replacing the existing Long Service Leave Act 1992 (Vic) (the “LSL Act“). The provisions are likely to become operational later this year.

What are some of the major changes?

  • Employees will be entitled to take long service leave after completing seven years’ continuous employment instead of 10 years.
  • Both paid and unpaid parental leave will count as service (other than in the case of a casual or seasonal worker).
  • An employee can request to take long service leave for a minimum period of one day, although an employer may refuse such a request if the employer has reasonable business grounds to do so.
  • Continuity of service will not be broken where a casual or seasonal employee:
    • takes up to two years’ parental leave (whether paid or unpaid);
    • obtains the employer’s agreement in advance to an absence;
    • has a break which is impacted by seasonal factors; or
    • has been engaged on a regular and systematic basis and has a reasonable expectation of being re-engaged.

In addition, if an employee’s working hours have changed during the two years immediately before taking long service leave, the employee’s normal weekly number of hours is the greater of: the average weekly hours worked over the past 52 weeks (one year), 260 weeks (five years) or the last period of continuous employment.

Criminal liability has been established with respect to breaches of a number of obligations under the LSL Act. This includes where an employer takes adverse action against an employee because the employee is entitled to long service leave or other entitlements under the LSL Act.

The LSL Act also provides for accessorial liability of certain officeholders of a corporation where they are shown to have been knowingly involved in the commission of an offence by the corporate entity.

Labour Hire Licensing

Victoria is continuing the trend of other states, such as South Australia and Queensland, with the Labour Hire Licensing Act 2018 (Vic) (the “Licensing Act”) receiving Royal Assent on 26 June 2018.

What are some of the major changes?

Similar to labour hire licensing legislation in other Australian states, the core features of the Licensing Act include:

  • the mandatory licensing of labour hire organisations operating within Victoria;
  • the requirement of labour hire licensing organisations to meet a “fit and proper person” test to ensure that minimum standards are met;
  • penalties imposed on non-compliant labour hire organisations and on individuals/organisations engaging with non-compliant labour hire organisations; and
  • the establishment of a Labour Hire Licensing Authority (based in Bendigo) and the Office of the Labour Hire Licensing Commissioner.

A Federal labour hire system?

The Federal Labor party has promised, as an election pledge, to introduce a uniform federal scheme that would guarantee the same pay and conditions for labour hire workers as award-covered employees throughout Australia. In addition, under this model, labour hire organisations would need to demonstrate compliance with relevant workplace legislation (including the Fair Work Act 2009 (Cth) and tax, superannuation, WHS and immigration laws) in order to maintain a license.

If you require any advice as to how these legislative changes may affect you or your organisation, please feel free contact People + Culture Strategies on (02) 8094 3100.

Minimum wage up by 3.5% from 1 July 2018

On 1 June 2018, the Fair Work Commission (the “FWC”) handed down the decision in its annual wage review.

From the full pay period on or after 1 July 2018, the national minimum wage will be $719.20 per week (or $18.93 per hour). This represents an increase of $24.30 per week.

Following the decision, minimum wage rates in modern awards will be increased by 3.5% and a new national minimum wage order will be made with respect to award free employees.

What does this mean for employers?

  • Subject to the requirements of relevant modern awards, enterprise agreements and employment contracts, from 1 July 2018, employers must ensure that their full-time employees are paid at least $719.20 per week (or $18.93 per hour).
  • Employers must be aware of the award or agreement (if any) that applies to their employees and ensure wages are paid pursuant to it, noting that minimum wage rates in modern awards will be increased by 3.5%.
  • An employer who fails to pay wages in accordance with the national minimum wage order or requirements of a relevant award or agreement will be exposed to liability for breach of the Fair Work Act 2009 (Cth).

 

 

PCourseS – Online Education

Workplace Law Fundamentals

TOPICS

It will cover topics including:

  • Understand the evolution of Australia’s workplace relations systems
  • What are awards, enterprise agreements?
  • What claims can be brought in employment law?

Behaviour and Culture for Managers and HR Practitioners

TOPICS

It will cover topics including:

  • Provides guidance in relation to the often talked about topics of bullying, discrimination and sexual harassment
  • Understand the meanings of key concepts including “reasonable management action” and “unlawful”
  • Understand the role of the Fair Work Commission and Australian Human Rights Commission

Performance Management

TOPICS

It will cover topics including:

  • Understanding holistic performance management concepts
  • Define, align and communicate your organisation’s approach to performance management
  • Identify and manage risks associated with performance management within a disciplinary context

Conducting Workplace Investigations

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It will cover topics including:

  • Identify the circumstances in which a workplace investigation should be instigated and the requirements of each stage of the process
  • Identify potential issues that may be encountered
  • Understand best practice methods of dealing with issues

Risk Management in Termination of Employment

TOPICS

It will cover topics including:

  • Provides an overview of the considerations surrounding different methods of termination
  • Identify the circumstances in which an organisation might consider termination of employment
  • Identify how legal risks associated with termination can be managed

Work Health and Safety

TOPICS

It will cover topics including:

  • Guidance on the key basic duties and obligations under health and safety laws for businesses, officers and workers
  • Identify when to consult with other businesses and workers, and when to report incidents
  • Best practice in managing psychological and emotional health and wellbeing

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Webinars

In 2019, PCS will be conducting monthly webinars (of one hour’s duration) on the following topics:

13 February 2019Leading in Times of Crisis – A Case Study on Leadership
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13 March 2019Rules of Engagement: The Importance of Getting Contracts Right
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17 April 2019See you in Court: Understanding the Psyche of a Litigious or Disgruntled Employee
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15 May 2019The Four-Yearly Modern Award Review
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12 June 2019The Flip Side: The Different Angles of an Investigation
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17 July 2019Don’t Miss Me While I am Away: Managing Absence from the Workplace
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14 August 2019Knock Knock: Your Guide to Dealing with External Scrutiny
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18 September 2019That’s an Idea: Creating a Culture of Learning
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16 October 2019Fight or Flight: Best Practice Litigation Strategies for your Organisation
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13 November 2019Can we have a Chat: Strategies for having the Difficult Conversations
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To register your attendance at one (or all) of our webinars, please select the webinar link above and complete the registration details.

Advanced Strategic People Management (Facilitated by Joydeep Hor)

This program is suitable for Senior HR Professionals (minimum 10 years’ experience recommended)

TOPICS

It will cover topics including:

  • Auditing and impacting the culture of your organisation
  • Negotiation strategies in the workplace
  • Critical review of systems and HR infrastructure in your organisation
  • Influencing decision-makers on people issues
  • Understanding termination of employment across “bad fits” and employees who “don’t get it”

Next being held on Thursday, 20 June 2019 to Friday, 21 June 2019

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